Welcome to Belmont Acres Farm!

We are a 5-acre, family-run farm located right outside of Cambridge. We’re committed to growing a large diversity of the tastiest, freshest produce available with sustainable methods, emphasizing a Natural approach to agriculture. We encourage people to eat produce grown in season and to enjoy home cooked meals with friends and family.

Farm Stand is now open!

We operate a CSA and Farmstand in Belmont, MA; you can find directions to us here. For Pictures of the farm! For more information about our growing practices, check out our About page, click here for recipes and if you have any questions, don’t hesitate to drop us a line!


Fall Share – Sold Out

Belmont Acres Farm is offering a fall CSA with a limited number of shares this season that will run from November 7th through December 12 (six weeks of pick ups). Many Fall CSAs are monthly pickups, but our pickup is weekly. This is to not burden you with an overly large share that may be difficult for you to store (so we will do it for you). We also hope to offer more greens in the beginning before the weather turns too cold. Weather patterns are volatile in late fall and big changes can happen over the course of a month, more frequent pickups will mediate risk of more weather sensitive crops.

We have planted kale, collards, leeks, cauliflower, kohlrabi, brussel sprouts, potatoes, sweet potatoes, lettuce, swiss chard, fennel, garlic, shallots, sage, rosemary, thyme, arugula, turnips, radishes, pumpkins, winters squashes, carrots, popcorn, celeriac and beets. Of course what we plant doesn’t always mean it will end up in the share. Farming is high in risk and this has been a tough year to farm. We expect to provide at least $30 of produce in each share. We also include 1/2 dozen eggs in the share each week. The price for the share is $235. Pickups are at Belmont Acres Farm on Saturdays from 12:30 to 3:30pm

We expect to source cranberries from Plymouth and have partnered with Bascolm Hollow Farm for pork and ground beef. These will be offered at additional cost. We are looking into several other locally sourced items and will keep members informed of other items we may be able to provide.

Contact us if you would like sign up or have additional questions about our CSA.

What Farmers Do In the Off Season

At the end of the season many people assume there is nothing to do on a farm after a frost and that the farmer travels to exotic destinations until spring. This is far from the the truth and there are many things to do. Seeds have been ordered, organizing paper work for taxes, organizing the help and still have the day job to tend.
Our goats and ducks require care every day, even more when the weather gets as cold as it has been the past few days. The runner ducks have been a grumpy bunch since the farm slowed down in November and have had to learn about ice and snow.

Each season teaches us a lot and weeds continue to be a topic of much discussion on the farm. Work more, try harder and do better is the goal with weeds this year. Got a wheel hoe, I looked at a Farmall Cub last weekend and added sweeps to the cultivator shanks. Flame weeder will get a lot more us this year too.

Narineh was with me today and said ‘the barn is a mess’. Still have to work on the stand, build bee hives, more cold frame, equipment repair and the list goes on. I’m sure I have forgotten something that I will remember when I am standing in a field in spring. Not long ago the farm stand was filled with produce and now it is filled with the promise of the season ahead.

We are still open!

Though we are in the midst of a polar vortex, we still have crops in the field as we move into the Persephone months!

The temperatures have been in the mid to low twenties at night and the ground has frozen solid, but the lettuce in the low tunnels are holding up well. It has been so cold that even several varieties of kale are struggling.

We have some arugula that is growing in a cold frame inside the hoop house. Two layers of protection against the cold and wind. We are hoping to harvest this around Christmas time for the holidays.

Stop by the stand and pick up some squash to go along with our lettuce. We also have carrots, potatoes, beets, garlic, celery, celeriac, brussel sprouts, cabbage and herbs.


Belmont Acres celebrates National Food Day Saturday October 25

In celebration of National Food Day, Belmont Acres Farm joins Americans around the country in gathering to enjoy real, local food and promote community and conversation.


Join us from 10am-12pm on Saturday October 25 for:

-       Farm tour

-       Cooking and canning demonstrations

-       Visit from State Senator William Brownsberger


34 Glenn Rd, Belmont


Fall has brought a lush array of flowers to the farm, and the rich and varied burgundy, red and pink hues of amaranth are a farm favorite.  Tall spikes of amaranth seed are towering at six feet tall now, growing in the rows right next to our lettuces and other greens.  Hermik arranges them into stunning bouquets with zinnias, sunflowers, dill and herbs.






Fall decorations

Richly colored, plump pumpkins grown right here in our fields, harvested now and available for Fall decorations…or for delicious pies and roasted seeds.

Bunches of corn stalks and flowers decorate the farm stand and are available for purchase.


Come visit us and pick up Belmont-grown, fresh Fall decorations for your home.

Happy Fall!



Last call for Summer crops

With Fall approaching, we are enjoying the last few weeks of Summer crop harvests.

Come visit the farm stand for heirloom tomatoes, corn, eggplant, fresh flowers, and much more.  Highlights below.

Heirloom tomatoes








Community-support agriculture (CSA) baskets loaded with Summer produce and ready for pickup

Baba ganoush, tomato, picked eggplant, cabbage, and purslane – all made from farm-grown vegetables

Eggplant parmesan (farm eggplant and heirloom tomatoes) garnished with edible nasturtium flowers



Uncommon Grounds

We are delighted to have our farm’s fresh vegetables featured in delicious dishes at Uncommon Grounds restaurant in neighboring Watertown.  Uncommon Grounds owner Lisa comes to the farm personally for vegetables which chef Chris whips up into lovely featured dishes like this roasted beet salad with mesclun greens, goat cheese, fresh apples and orange slices, pistachio nuts and a homemade Sherry Vinaigrette dressing.

We are so happy to be working with great partners like Uncommon Grounds, and helping to make food seriously local!

Uncommon Grounds was voted Boston’s Best in Breakfast, 2013.

The restaurant is located at 575 Mount Auburn St in Watertown.  More info at www.myuncommongrounds.com.




Our farm watermelons are ready for harvest!


Here’s Mike harvesting the first few fruit.

Farm visitors often tell us how amazed they are to see these melons in our fields – right here in Massachusetts.  Though watermelon requires a long hot Summer growing season and is more commonly grown in the South, it is possible to grow it in the Northeast too.

A few months ago, we planted, watered generously, and laid down salt marsh hay to deter weed growth and give the plants’ long vines room to ramble and grow.  We protected the melons from animals with fencing, and were delighted to watch them set fruit and flourish.


We sliced one open to enjoy yesterday during farm lunch break.  It was juicy with few seeds and a thin rind – sweet and refreshing.

Community-supported agriculture (CSA) share customers received melons in their baskets yesterday, and melons are available for sale at the farm stand, Tue 3-6pm, Fri 2-5pm, Sat 1-5pm.


These ten young ducks joined the farm in April and have charmed our farmers and visitors alike.


They splash in their kiddie pool, forage for bugs, and run around the farm, upright and curious.


A week ago, one of them laid its first egg – tiny.  This weekend, another – a bit bigger.  Hopefully by Fall we’ll have a steady stream of duck eggs.   The large brown egg in this photo is a chicken egg, for comparison.

ducks in action